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Organic Silk vs Silk

 

What’s the difference between Organic and commercial silk?

First of all, the difference between the two is not that big, but the result of choosing one over the other makes a difference. The process is almost the same, but the scale of which they are produced and what is put into the production is not.

Silk is one of the oldest fibers we know of and has its origin from China, around 2600 BC.  The cultivation of silkworms in order to produce silk is called sericulture. The first step in the production is called “hatching the eggs”. During this stage, silkworms lay eggs in an artificial environment with the  aim of getting them to lay as many eggs as possible. The female produces around 300 tot 400 eggs at the time. The silkworm dies right after laying these eggs. After 10 days, the eggs hatch into larvae (caterpillars), and the feeding period starts.

During the feeding period in commerical silk production the larvae is fed mulberry leaves (results in the finest silk) and grow very fast. They eat around 50.000 times of their initial weight. In approximately 6 weeks, the larvae are 10.000 times heavier than at the time of hatching, and ready to spin a silk cocoon. The silkworm needs around 3 till 8 days to spin a cocoon, thereby producing one kilometer of silk filament.

Silk worm
Silk worm

Organic silk has more or less the same processing as conventional silk here, but no pesticides, insecticides or harsh chemicals have been used to make land or larva grow faster. The silkworms get a more varied diet instead of mulberry leafs alone, and everything is organic.

When the coooon is ready, it is treated with boiling water or hot air and the silk filaments are unwounded again, getting soft by the heat, which is called “reeling the filament”.

In nature, at this point, the silkworm (e.g. chrysalis) would break out of the cocoon and become a moth. However, this would damage the silk fibers, and therefore the chrysalis is killed before the thread is collected from the cocoon.

Wad Silk dress - photo: Tse Kao
Wad Silk dress – photo: Tse Kao

The process in organic silk production and commercial production is more or less the same in the stage where the silkthread is collected. There is still no way of keeping the thread in one piece and make the moth survive.

One cocoon contains only a small amount of silk and around 2500 silkworms are needed in order to produce one pound of raw silk. Silk amounts to only a very small percentage of the total textile fiber market, even less than 0.2%. Organic silk is then again a marginal percentage of this. The production is small and controlled, thus also creates a smaller amount of raw material.

To conclude:

  • Organic silk  still kills the silk worm to get one length of thread. If you want silk where the silk work leaves the cocoon before the thread is collected, you need to look at Peace Silk/Wild silk. Here the fabric has structure and is stiffer than traditional silk.
  • Organic silk is not produced in the same volumes as commercial silk. The process is longer and there are no chemicals used in any step of the production.

    Elsien Gringhuis diagonal blazer in beige silk
    Elsien Gringhuis diagonal Wild silk blazer in beige
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The Story of Hyrv

Hyrv banner

 

Tallin-based jewelry brand, collecting its inspiration from nature’s pure lines and having a contemporary fresh take on jewel crafting.

 

The start

JF started working with Hyrv spring 2018. We met in our common love for simple, elegant and classic design that lives on forever (and is even handed down through generations), and of course in our common denominator; sustainable and well thought through processes.

Since then we’ve seen Hyrv grow and gaining new followers. They are consistent in the way they build their universe, and we couldn’t be more proud to work with designer Kateryna and her team.

 

Design process

All of Hyrvs collections are made in their studio in Harjumaa, Tallin, Estonia. The team uses a combination of handcraft and 3D printing, but also do customization and special customer-collaborations.

The workshop has 3 workers and some part time freelancers when orders are larger. The facility holds a high standard when it comes to both worker and environmental guidelines.

Hyrv only use recycled silver, natural stones and other natural materials in their collections. For polishing or matting silver surface they use walnut shells or other organic fillers. Artisanal methods are implemented in every collection, and they use non-toxic and low energy sources. E.g. the use of 3D printing increase efficiency, use less energy than other methods, and is a significant way of reducing unwanted waste.

Hyrv decided early on to not use any synthetic inserts, packaging or exhibition displays (for storefronts) that could be harmful to the environment. They only use natural and recycled material for their displays and packaging, like the 3D printed wood plates and the recycled cotton and paper bags and boxes. It is both 100% recycled and recyclable.

 

Overview of ass products from Hyrv Antler and Coco collection

 

 


Founder and designer

The driving force behind Hyrv is founder and Creative Director Kateryna Pishon. She was born in Tallinn and got her BA in Jewellery Design from Estonian Academy of Arts. After polishing her skills at Antwerp Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten (The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp), she worked in a New York’s jewelry company. This combination of experiences gave her the base she needed to start up Hyrv in 2012. She then felt confident that the time was right to experiment with a variety of ideas, materials, processes and techniques.

 

 

“I design for modern, young people with a varied day. I want to design jewelry pieces that are chic and easy to wear, but will also make you stand out.”

Kateryna Pishon

 

See full collection from Hyrv here

 

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The story of Hekne

Hekne

 

Each HEKNE collection carries the colours of a selected bird. This way the label connects each collection to nature and give themselves restrictions that elevates their universe.

 

 

 

Careful in all they do

HEKNE was established in 2013 by Anja Birgitte Daatland Hekne and Siglinde Maria Lunde, two childhood friends. The fall 2016 collection was their first, which also is a testament to the two women’s planning skills, doing every bit of their production with people and planet in mind. Spring 17 they launched their second collection.

Anja has a BA degree in Fashion Design from Ravensbourne College in London and has studied Marketing Management at CPHbusiness in Copenhagen. Siglinde has studied PR and marketing at BI Norwegian Business School in Oslo.

 

Connected to nature

HEKNE is all about the slow way of producing, and they find their inspiration in the organic harmony of nature. They want to take part in changing the pattern of overconsumption, focusing instead on small classic collections which can, both in quality and cut, last more than one season.

Skagen Coat in dark brown organic Wool
Skagen Coat in dark brown organic Wool

Early fall 17 Hekne updated their universe with two classics, off course built with organic and recycled materials, and every bit produced under organized and good conditions in a small factoriy in Lithuania. The two-piece capsule is inspired by the Mallard

The mallard
The mallard

See full collection from Hekne here

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Mørck – High quality leather

Mørck design

 

Behind the label

Norwegian label Mørck consists of mother and daughter team, Marianne Mørck and Monika Mørck Hauge. Marianne has her background in orthopedics (which is closely related to the body and the individual), and Monika is an educated artist.

 

Mørck design in goatleather
Mørck design in goatleather

Carefully selected

Mørck advocates for natural and traditional materials and wish to promote local businesses as well as ethical and sustainable production. They collaborate with tanneries in different countries and spend a great deal of time finding the leather, where the quality and sustainable choice is evident.

To choose goat, reindeer and for the first time FW17, Norwegian lamb leather, is something that makes logistics an important part of the labels collection planning. The dream would be to do the whole process closer to home, but for now this is impossible. It is a true evidence of the labels sustainable core, that they do not choose the easiest route, but instead make sure each product is made with the right type of leather.

Mørck - photography by Ole Elker
Mørck – photography by Ole Elker

Small concise collections

Mørck combines these ancient material traditions with modern design and solid craftsmanship. Through the acknowledgement of the inherent qualities of natural materials, clothes with durability and patina are created. Leather from salmon and reindeer is by nature a limited resource. There are practical limits for manufacture. Consequently, the collections by Mørck will inevitably be small and exclusive.

Mørck Stitching only use leather from livestock animals that have free range of movement and from farmers treating animals with respect when it comes to protection, breeding and health.

Salmon and reindeer were important factors of survival for the early settlers in the north thousands of years ago. They provided food. They provided clothing. Towards the end of the Stone Age, the goat gradually became important for people’s livelihood. Mørck takes up again these traditions by showing that use of the leather can be luxurious, long lasting and of the highest quality.

 

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Working with Elsien Gringhuis

Elsien Gringhuis knee length dress in off white

The start

Just Fashion started working with Elsien Gringhuis a few years back. With our shared core values it was a great meet. Thanks to Skype we are always able to talk directly with designers far away and get a sense of how they work and think on a personal level. This is really important to us.

From this starting point we have seen Elsien grow, building each stone of her business on the same ground principles and keeping her core. Being featured in Italian and German Vogue last year as a design talent to watch was a great confirmation that Elsien manages what we want to show the world; it is possible to be forward thinking and deliver FASHION while still choosing better production methods and raw materials in the process.

Elsien Grinhuis close up
Elsien Grinhuis close up

 

Building a book

Elsien’s design is not built on collections and seasons. The design is made much more like books, where each collection brings a new chapter, but all parts of the book are always available. Comparing the collections, you can see the similarities in the style and the design, the colour scheme and the cut of the products, and it is all made to build on each other and be mixed and matched. Elsien always use a shape element in each collection. That way each chapter she produces is stringent and saves fabric in the process.

Image: Tse Kao, Elsien Gringhuis Clay Trousers in eco cotton with digital print
Image: Tse Kao, Elsien Gringhuis Clay Trousers in eco cotton with digital print

 

Design process

Elsien’s design principal is completely based on sustainability. Form, function, material and finishing all contribute to designs with a long life span and high quality. Being a sustainable brand is more than using just the best fabrics. All design is built on the No Waste principle, trying to make a result of nearly no waste in the design process. The focus is on highly innovative patterns that reduce the waste to a minimum.

 

High end fabric quality

Elsien Gringhuis works with wool, cotton, silk and other natural materials bought from trusted retailers in Italy and the Netherlands.  The label does their best at finding a balance between being sustainable and being a high-end fashion label. Most fabrics are GOTS, BCI and/or Oekotex certified, and the goal is to get all of them certified. The important thing though, is to keep the fabric quality high, so the design will last a lifetime. All items are produce locally in Elsien’s studio, on demand, not made before you order them.

Elsien Gringhuis wool sweater in grey
Elsien Gringhuis wool sweater in grey

Education and rewards

  • Cum Laude at the academy of visual arts in Arnhem (ArtEZ).
  • Won the Createurope in Berlin, the Mittelmoda in Italy and was nominated for the Frans Molenaar-award.
  • Presented her first collection during the Amsterdam Fashion Week in 2009.
  • Won the Green Fashion Competition in 2011
  • Won the Fair Luxury Award in 2012.

 

 

“A functional and well thought out design makes me very happy. All good things are simple, but there is nothing more difficult than to make a good and simple design.”

– Elsien Gringhuis

 

 

 

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Our designers at Oslo Runway SS17

Beate Godager transparent jacket

We are so proud to announce that two of our designers are taking part in this year’s Oslo Runway. If you are in Oslo, make sure you get yourself a ticket to the show.

 

Beate Godager

Beate Godager was picked by a jury of business insiders to participate in a talent selection showing at the runway 23rd of August.

Beate Godager demin top
Beate Godager demin top

The jury consisted of Charlotte Bik BandlienLasse Fløde, Carmita Carlsson and Torunn Myklebust.

Bik bok fashion award 2016
Bik Bok Runway Award 2016

Hasla

Hasla is showcasing their design in the jewelry showroom at Sentralen in the heart of Oslo 24th of August. You can among other designs look at their new pearl collection launching shortly.

Hasla Ballance pearl collection
Hasla Ballance pearl collection

 

Hasla Ballance pearl collection
Hasla Ballance pearl collection

 

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5 Versions of the suit – (with a good conscience)

"I have always wanted a great suit! With the ones from Kerber, I can mix and match my own feminin/masculine variant. Great blue colour as well"

 

The suit is always an investment. Not only does it work dresses up as an ensemble, but also, it is great to wear as separates, as blazer and pants with casual tops, denim, sweatpants etc. Perfect for a casual cool look.

We’ve collected some people who look both flawless and cool in their suits. Stylists, fashion insiders and creative’s with their own style, mixed up with our eco suggestions from our luxury handmade label Kerber. Masculine or feminine, their suits come in mix-and-match models to choose from, and they last a lifetime.

 

Keep scrolling to see and shop 5 looks that will elevate your wardrobe

 

Mix masculinity and femininity.

Comfy waist, cropped legs and a longer jacket. Feminine and masculine in one, elevates the feeling of effortlessness. Choose a loose singlet or t-shirt underneath to dress up or down. The keyword is loose.

 

Our feminine/masculine (conscious) suggestion:

Kerber Comfy Pants,    (1.997 NOK (no added expences)  Norway /€168 rest of the world)
Kerber Business Jacket   (2.979 NOK (no added expences) Norway, €250 rest of the world)

 

Elevate length with loose legs.

You don’t need to wear a traditional colour to look chick.

 

Our loose leg suggestion:

 

Fatal Pants in Blue,    (2.099 NOK Norway / €177 rest of the world)
Business Jacket in Blue,   (2.979 NOK Norway / €250 rest of the world)

 

Never be afraid to use your femininity.

Something that always works is the feminine black suit. With narrow, cropped legs and a jacket that elevate the waist.

Our feminine ensamble suggestion:

Disco Pants,   (1.971 NOK Norway / €165 rest of the world)
Stall Jacket,   (3.004 NOK Norway / €252 rest of the world)

 

Embrace the slouchy masculine laidback trousers.

Works so well with brogues or sneakers.

 

Our laidback slouchy pants suggestion:

AW15_Flatter_pants_wool_black_one_strap_v_top_forest_green_473_F_Just-Fshion kopi

Flatter Pants, (on request here)

 

Try the white shirt with high-waisted pants.

That’s enough. Style a feminine shirt with a high waisted loose pair of pants.

Our shirt + pants combo suggestion:

 

AW15_Urban_pants_polyester_black_uni_form_shirt_off_white_391_F_Just-Fshion

Urban Pants : (2.106 NOK Norway / €176 rest of the world)
Uni Form Shirt: (1.903 NOK Norway / €159 rest of the world)

 

Get inspired and choose better when you can!

Hugs from the Just Fashion Team

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In the studio.

From Hasla's workshop in Valle in Setesdal

Here you se the making of one ring. It is molded into a form an then goes through many stages before it becomes the ring you get when you order.

When the whole process is seen like this, in one, you kind of get the picture of how long it takes. It is also a great way to appreciate the fact that is can still be made like this, slowly with craftsmen and women, getting their pay.

Go to all Hasla products>

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To make it all go in a circle.

Elisabeth and Victoria Lejonhjarta with JohannaN necklace and ring

 

This is a story about Just Fashion, and a strong woman we have gotten to know during the growth of our site. Johanna and her jewelry label JohannaN, was the fifth label to come onboard Just Fashion. We want you to know what she is up to!

Production in Bangkok

Johanna produce at two production sites in Bangkok, and they have been with her all the way from the start in 2009.

In the workshop of Cha and Joy
In the workshop of Cha and Joy

Family Workshops

The metal workshops, she knows in and out, and they have grown with her. Tom and Boom are husband and wife-team. They have a small workshop in the first floor of their house in the middle of Bangkok. Tom is sawing all the pieces and Boom is managing their orders, checks the quality, and puts on chains before dispatch to Sweden.

Tom and Boom in their Workshop with their daughter
Tom and Boom in their Workshop with their daughter

They are setting their own price on their work and that’s what Johanna pay them – done deal. Johanna can now ensure them full time work – which I bet feels great!

Since Johanna has been growing a lot the last years, she now also works with a second and third family workshop, Joi and his wife Nok, and Cha and his wife Joi.

In addition she also works closely with Boy, her creative collaborator in Bangkok and he communicate with all teams and takes care of the logistics.

Watch this short film showing the handsawing in the workshop

 

Family Factory

The bigger factory that does the casting is family owned with around 60 workers. The last visit to this factory was in February 2014. This factory is also located in Bangkok, and will be a focus in January when Johanna is going back to Thailand.

 

The raw material

There are large deposits of zinc and copper in Thailand. These metals are combined to form brass, which is a traditional material, used in the Buddha figures and in many religious ornaments and sculptures.

johanna n This is Home adjustable bracelet, seen from abve
johannaN This is Home adjustable bracelet, seen from above

This tradition means that there are people with knowledge about the old way of doing the sawing and casting process that can be given work.  Over time, generations of creative artisans built a tradition of craftsmanship around brass – a craft tradition that today only exists in a few places in the world (Abareness also uses these skills in their jewelry workshop in Nepal)

 

johanna n umeå ring with beetle, seen from front
JohannaN umeå ring with beetle, seen from front

It’s been a pain in the ass to try to track the raw material. With gold and silver, there are a lot happening in the world in regards to sourcing, but with brass, the doors are still closed and there is no tradition for these kinds of investigations. One believes that around 70 % of all brass around is already recycled, but we would of course like to know where OUR (our designers) brass is from. This is an ongoing process, if you are a brass wiz and want to share, let us know!! 

 

Can a business have a personal moral?

Yes, we do believe they can!

There are so many people who are skeptical to the concept of ethical fashion. It is such a wide term, and also difficult to grasp and to see something else than a trend in it. Well, it is in these meetings with our designers, by knowing them, that all doubt about their intentions is washed away. With JohannaN, I have been sure from the start.

Full action in the workshop
Full action in the workshop

She has walked the hardest way, to make her brand sustainable, and now she has come full circle in so many ways. The things that are still difficult to change are really difficult to change!!! Its complicated, sitting in Sweden, trying to get access to the details around the production, not because things are secret, but because there are no tradition for these kinds of investigations in Thailand.

To manage to make a lasting change, it is essential for our designers and us to understand the culture in the country in which we operate. To make room for dialog that can stretch over time, so there are no misunderstandings.

Elisabeth and Victoria Lejonhjarta with JohannaN necklace and ring
Two beautiful up and coming fans, Elisabeth and Victoria Lejonhjarta with JohannaN necklace and ring

 

It is about knowing peoples cultural habits, and making them understand that you want to get under their skin, working WITH them, not having hidden agendas and papers with small writing on them. And this goes both ways.

 

JohannaN's second hand system. You can borrow, excange and deliver back what you dont use
JohannaN’s second hand system. You can borrow, excange and deliver back what you dont use

The skepticism is often grounded in fear of prices being forced down, or fair of losing the order completely, or that somebody will force changes on them that makes the production difficult. They can be scared that questions are about taking something away from them, like they may have experienced before.

 

a form from the casting process of the jewelry
form from the casting process of the jewelry

In January, Johanna is going back to Thailand to visit the workshop and the factory. We are going to be with her on her journey through films, stories and pictures. The thing with great designers with good intentions is that it never stops. It’s not about either or, it is about the journey and the choices one makes along the way.

Designer Johanna N herself
Designer JohannaN

 

And remember, , if you buy your JohannaN products at Just Fashion, you support both of us in our work towards a sustainable future!

Marte & Just Fashion

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Conscious inspiration

Swedish Stockings captued by people

From time to time, we share your pictures. Nothing makes us more happy than to see our designers pieces in use, on conscious people, out there in the world. Tag your picture with #myjustfashionstory if you want it to ne easier for us to find you:)

 

ABARENESS

 

DUTCH BASICS

SKALL STUDIO

 

“People need clothes that are cool AND ethical.
People need to know that there are designers with a conscience out there.
People need to learn how to value and keep their clothes.
It all starts with transparancy”

Just Fashion

 

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

 

 

“We have the power in each and every purchase we do. By bying clothes from designers who really work the right way, you will give the world a bump in a better direction. Quality beats quantity any day! Products are so much more than products”

Just Fashion

KERBER

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

 

JOHANNA N

 

BLACK RAT

Creds to @jacob.cr2 • #darkhair #piercings #creds #verticallabret #blackrat

A post shared by 👸🏻 (@mithrinn) on

DUTCH BASICS

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

In love with my new tights #swedishstockings #premiumhosiery

A post shared by Noa Estelle Hulleman (@noaestelle) on

NO SLEEP UNTIL JUNE

No sleep until june #nosleepuntiljune

A post shared by Thea Dyring (@theadyring) on

DUTCH BASICS

NO SLEEP UNTIL JUNE

 

ABARENESS

❤️ from me to all of you! @abarenessfashion #sponset 📷: @fotoesben

A post shared by ❥ Jannicke Valen (@aimforhappiness) on

 

 

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Qualities of Porcelain

Dutch Basics classic eco jewelry

 

Origin

  • China was the birthplace of porcelain making, and it’s been found in the shape that we know today, as early as the 206 BC (the Han Dynasty).
  • Marco Polo was one of the first Europeans to learn about porcelain, but it didn’t enter the European marked until around 1517.
  • In these ancient times, it was very expensive and only used by the rich and famous.
Dutch Basics adjustable porcelain ring with one white and one black porcelain stone
Dutch Basics adjustable porcelain ring with one white and one black porcelain stone

 

Why porcelain?

 

Natural ancient process

Porcelain is a ceramic material, made by heating materials in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C. The end result is always a surprise, since the colour constantly changes during the process. Kaolin is the primary material from which porcelain is made, but also clay minerals normally account for a small proportion of the whole.

Dutch Basics Double drop earrings in porcelain
Dutch Basics Double drop earrings in porcelain

Incredibly strong

Porcelain is a strong material and will last a long time! You can find proof of that in ancient ruins in the Middle East, and also in the fact that is is still used in making of teeth. The toughness, strength and translucency comes mainly from vitrification at the high temperatures it goes through.

Longevity

Porcelain conserve its colour and characteristics for a long time. Words that describe it is: hard, tough, completely vitrified, whiteness, translucency, resonance. and a high resistance to chemical attack and thermal shock.

 

The Porcelain collection

Dutch Basics was inspired by China and the far East, and wanted to merge this with its own classic simplicity. The collection was developed in collaboration with Chantal Lensink and Gaby van Deutekom. I is also done in collaboration with a small Dutch workshop, where people with disadvantages get a chance to work in their own pace. The silver and gold pieces are made in Dutch Basics permanent jewelry workshop in Portugal.

 

Watch Dutch Basics making of the collection

See the products in store.

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Women Supporting Women

Marielle Kerber and Thuy in the factory in Vietnam, supporting women through good working conditions and by involving the craftswomen in the designing process

“Despite great strides made by the international women’s rights movement over many years, women and girls around the world are still married as children or trafficked into forced labor and sex slavery. They are refused access to education and political participation, and some are trapped in conflicts where rape is perpetrated as a weapon of war. Around the world, deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth are needlessly high, and women are prevented from making deeply personal choices in their private lives”

Human Rights Watch

 

The Gender Gap

At Just Fashion we fight for gender and race-equality. We believe that everybody should have equal rights to make the same choices in their lives, which is not nearly the case today.

Based in Norway, Just Fashion are one of the lucky ones, at 3rd place in the Global Gender Gap Report for 2014, only beaten by Iceland and Finland.

It’s much worse for countries further down on the scale, like Nepal on 112th place, and all the way down to Yemen, at 154th place, the last one.

From the factory outside of Kathmandu in Nepal, where a/bareness know that their workers have good pay and a say in things
From the factory outside of Kathmandu in Nepal, where a/bareness know that their workers have good pay and a say in things

 

Supporting women through your fashion buys

Several designers at Just Fashion are working with women in countries further down on this list, and they make sure that

  • their factories and workshops strengthen women’s rights
  • giving not only minimum wage but also living wage
  • making sure that they have good working conditions and that the women are heard

 

From the project a/abareness did in a village in Nepal where women got to work from their homes
From the project a/abareness did in a village in Nepal where women got to work from their homes

Outside Kathmandu in Nepal our designers Abareness have taken part in a project where women, because of their caste, cannot leave their village. By giving them the opportunity to work from home, their economy and status is strengthened. These products are now unfortunately sold out, but we are hoping there are new projects to come.

Dark statistics

 

From Kerbers factory in Vietnam. Thuy working on silk products, a tricky material which need sklls to be done right
From Kerbers factory in Vietnam. Thuy working on silk products, a tricky material which need sklls to be done right

 

Just Fashion designers supporting women

By supporting designers who make sure that women get paid, not only minimum, but also a living wage, you can take part in slowly changing a mentality in countries where women rarely get a say. And in other countries, like Germany, Norway and the Netherlands, you will give a share to women in professions that are not considered prestigious or important.
Here are the designers you should buy from at Just Fashion to make sure you support women in some way.

Abareness

Makes sure that the women in the bigger knitting factory have good working conditions and living wage pay. In addition, Abareness is actively supporting educational projects that doesn’t discriminate between girls and boys, through their #coolkidsneedscleanwater project.

 

#Coolkidsneedcleanwater, a/abareness project in schools in Kathmandu
#Coolkidsneedcleanwater, a/abareness project in schools in Kathmandu

Anne Gorke

Anne Gorke modelling her Parrot Dress
Anne Gorke modelling her Parrot Dress

Are supports independent craftswomen in and around Weimar in Germany.

Apollonius

Is a woman; designer Emma does all the work herself in her studio in Oslo.

Elsien Gringhuis

Supports independent craftswomen in Netherlands. In addition, she only use women of all ages, and with focus on their thoughts, ambitions and aspirations in her lookbook campaigns, and by doing so, shows another side of fashion than the too young clothing hanger-model.

 

Liesbeth runs Fashion council Netherland and is modelling an outfit in Elsiens Gringhuis last lookbook
Liesbeth runs Fashion council Netherland and is modelling an outfit in Elsiens Gringhuis last lookbook
IIIF leather bag made by an independent female craftswoman
IIIF leather bag made by an independent female craftswoman

Idamari

Does all the work herself, in her studio in Berlin, and she is obviously a woman.

IIIF

Works with one craftswomen on Iceland for their leather bag-collection.

Kerber

Works with craftswomen (and men) in Hoi an in Vietnam. They get living wage and are encouraged in developing their skills, also taking part in the design process.

Retusj

Karen Pederstad is the designer behind Retusj, also made by hand by the designers herself in her studio in Oslo.

Just Fashion

Almost everybody involved in Just Fashion are women , and our founder is a woman. By supporting us, you also support our fight to find more designers who believe in gender and race-equality, regardless of their gender.

Just Fashion founder Marte DJupesland
Just Fashion founder Marte DJupesland

Learn more about gender equality

This video from World Economic Forum tells a short version of why the report about gender equality is important

Read and look at key statistics from the Gender Gap Report here, or download the total report.

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Behind our products

The designers at Just Fashion can tell you a lot of stories, still their products also speek for themselves.  Together we work towards full control and transparency in every aspect of the journey our products take. Here are some of them, take a look.

 

designer Anne Gorke
Designer Anne Gorke
Designer Cathrine Rosseland
The designer Cathrine Rosseland

 

 

 

 

Designer Marielle on her bicycle in Han Noi
Designer Marielle on her bicycle in Han Noi

 

Designers Linn and Nadja
Designer Linn and Nadja

 

Designer Elsien Gringhuis
Designer Elsien Gringhuis

 

Doris, the founder of Dutch Basics
Doris, the founder of Dutch Basics

 

Designer behind Apollonius Clothing Emma Linjedahl with her dog Kodac
Designer behind Apollonius Clothing Emma Linjedahl with her dog Kodac