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Conscious inspiration

Swedish Stockings captued by people

From time to time, we share your pictures. Nothing makes us more happy than to see our designers pieces in use, on conscious people, out there in the world. Tag your picture with #myjustfashionstory if you want it to ne easier for us to find you:)

 

ABARENESS

 

DUTCH BASICS

SKALL STUDIO

 

“People need clothes that are cool AND ethical.
People need to know that there are designers with a conscience out there.
People need to learn how to value and keep their clothes.
It all starts with transparancy”

Just Fashion

 

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

 

 

“We have the power in each and every purchase we do. By bying clothes from designers who really work the right way, you will give the world a bump in a better direction. Quality beats quantity any day! Products are so much more than products”

Just Fashion

KERBER

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

 

JOHANNA N

 

BLACK RAT

Creds to @jacob.cr2 • #darkhair #piercings #creds #verticallabret #blackrat

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DUTCH BASICS

SWEDISH STOCKINGS

In love with my new tights #swedishstockings #premiumhosiery

A post shared by Noa Estelle Hulleman (@noaestelle) on

NO SLEEP UNTIL JUNE

No sleep until june #nosleepuntiljune

A post shared by Thea Dyring (@theadyring) on

DUTCH BASICS

NO SLEEP UNTIL JUNE

 

ABARENESS

❤️ from me to all of you! @abarenessfashion #sponset 📷: @fotoesben

A post shared by ❥ Jannicke Valen (@aimforhappiness) on

 

 

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Just Fashion goes Tupperware

 

First homeparty

Just Fashion decided that we want to travel to you, and at the same time get to see our country. Our first trip was planned for the West Coast, to Bergen.

We call it Just Fashion goes Tupperware

Leaving Oslo.... Just Fashion goes Tupperware
Leaving Oslo…. Just Fashion goes Tupperware
Making energy while driving a Hybrid
Making energy while driving a Hybrid

Last Weekend we got into Eline’s Hybrid for a ride from Oslo, over Hardangervidda, all the way to Bergen, where a small bunch of women and men got to tough, feel, try on, and buy our products, while enjoying each others company and a few glasses of something good.

Over the Mountain

at 1000 meter, Ustaoset
at 1000 meter, Ustaoset


It was a perfect ride over Hardangervidda. In Norwegian we call it “trollsk”.. the best English word would be “bewitching”. 

Hardangervidda
Hardangervidda
Hardangervidda
Hardangervidda

 

Roadtrip to Just Fashions first homeparty, Just Fashion goes Tupperware
Roadtrip to Just Fashions first homeparty, Just Fashion goes Tupperware

 

So what is a Tupperware party?

Definition:
social gathering invented by the company Tupperware in the 1950’s, where the host (or more typically hostess) entertained the guests, and provides them with an opportunity to order Tupperware. 

 

Just Fashion is a whole other company with another agenda, but the concept is the same, to let people relax and have the time to hear our stories and talk to us, one on one.

 

 
When you get to tough and feel things in a relaxed setting with your friends, we hope you also get that sense of higher value that our products carry. The stories and the time spent making them, will always be a part of the product you take with you home. Or the product you order and have to wait for, for it to be made.

Swedish Stockings recycled nylon stockings
Swedish Stockings recycled nylon stockings


 

Over the mountain again and back

On the way back everything had changed.

Just in the course of that Weekend, the mountrain-tops went white…

Bilde 09.11.2015, 14.31.53

Hardangervidda home
Hardangervidda home

Back in Oslo

We must say that we are so pleased with meeting new people and talking about our goal with this company. We want to travel more. If you are more than 10 people and want to make the same kind of experience, let us know (in Norwegian if you like), and we will try to come:)

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Qualities of Porcelain

Dutch Basics classic eco jewelry

 

Origin

  • China was the birthplace of porcelain making, and it’s been found in the shape that we know today, as early as the 206 BC (the Han Dynasty).
  • Marco Polo was one of the first Europeans to learn about porcelain, but it didn’t enter the European marked until around 1517.
  • In these ancient times, it was very expensive and only used by the rich and famous.
Dutch Basics adjustable porcelain ring with one white and one black porcelain stone
Dutch Basics adjustable porcelain ring with one white and one black porcelain stone

 

Why porcelain?

 

Natural ancient process

Porcelain is a ceramic material, made by heating materials in a kiln to temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 °C. The end result is always a surprise, since the colour constantly changes during the process. Kaolin is the primary material from which porcelain is made, but also clay minerals normally account for a small proportion of the whole.

Dutch Basics Double drop earrings in porcelain
Dutch Basics Double drop earrings in porcelain

Incredibly strong

Porcelain is a strong material and will last a long time! You can find proof of that in ancient ruins in the Middle East, and also in the fact that is is still used in making of teeth. The toughness, strength and translucency comes mainly from vitrification at the high temperatures it goes through.

Longevity

Porcelain conserve its colour and characteristics for a long time. Words that describe it is: hard, tough, completely vitrified, whiteness, translucency, resonance. and a high resistance to chemical attack and thermal shock.

 

The Porcelain collection

Dutch Basics was inspired by China and the far East, and wanted to merge this with its own classic simplicity. The collection was developed in collaboration with Chantal Lensink and Gaby van Deutekom. I is also done in collaboration with a small Dutch workshop, where people with disadvantages get a chance to work in their own pace. The silver and gold pieces are made in Dutch Basics permanent jewelry workshop in Portugal.

 

Watch Dutch Basics making of the collection

See the products in store.

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Women Supporting Women

Marielle Kerber and Thuy in the factory in Vietnam, supporting women through good working conditions and by involving the craftswomen in the designing process

“Despite great strides made by the international women’s rights movement over many years, women and girls around the world are still married as children or trafficked into forced labor and sex slavery. They are refused access to education and political participation, and some are trapped in conflicts where rape is perpetrated as a weapon of war. Around the world, deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth are needlessly high, and women are prevented from making deeply personal choices in their private lives”

Human Rights Watch

 

The Gender Gap

At Just Fashion we fight for gender and race-equality. We believe that everybody should have equal rights to make the same choices in their lives, which is not nearly the case today.

Based in Norway, Just Fashion are one of the lucky ones, at 3rd place in the Global Gender Gap Report for 2014, only beaten by Iceland and Finland.

It’s much worse for countries further down on the scale, like Nepal on 112th place, and all the way down to Yemen, at 154th place, the last one.

From the factory outside of Kathmandu in Nepal, where a/bareness know that their workers have good pay and a say in things
From the factory outside of Kathmandu in Nepal, where a/bareness know that their workers have good pay and a say in things

 

Supporting women through your fashion buys

Several designers at Just Fashion are working with women in countries further down on this list, and they make sure that

  • their factories and workshops strengthen women’s rights
  • giving not only minimum wage but also living wage
  • making sure that they have good working conditions and that the women are heard

 

From the project a/abareness did in a village in Nepal where women got to work from their homes
From the project a/abareness did in a village in Nepal where women got to work from their homes

Outside Kathmandu in Nepal our designers Abareness have taken part in a project where women, because of their caste, cannot leave their village. By giving them the opportunity to work from home, their economy and status is strengthened. These products are now unfortunately sold out, but we are hoping there are new projects to come.

Dark statistics

 

From Kerbers factory in Vietnam. Thuy working on silk products, a tricky material which need sklls to be done right
From Kerbers factory in Vietnam. Thuy working on silk products, a tricky material which need sklls to be done right

 

Just Fashion designers supporting women

By supporting designers who make sure that women get paid, not only minimum, but also a living wage, you can take part in slowly changing a mentality in countries where women rarely get a say. And in other countries, like Germany, Norway and the Netherlands, you will give a share to women in professions that are not considered prestigious or important.
Here are the designers you should buy from at Just Fashion to make sure you support women in some way.

Abareness

Makes sure that the women in the bigger knitting factory have good working conditions and living wage pay. In addition, Abareness is actively supporting educational projects that doesn’t discriminate between girls and boys, through their #coolkidsneedscleanwater project.

 

#Coolkidsneedcleanwater, a/abareness project in schools in Kathmandu
#Coolkidsneedcleanwater, a/abareness project in schools in Kathmandu

Anne Gorke

Anne Gorke modelling her Parrot Dress
Anne Gorke modelling her Parrot Dress

Are supports independent craftswomen in and around Weimar in Germany.

Apollonius

Is a woman; designer Emma does all the work herself in her studio in Oslo.

Elsien Gringhuis

Supports independent craftswomen in Netherlands. In addition, she only use women of all ages, and with focus on their thoughts, ambitions and aspirations in her lookbook campaigns, and by doing so, shows another side of fashion than the too young clothing hanger-model.

 

Liesbeth runs Fashion council Netherland and is modelling an outfit in Elsiens Gringhuis last lookbook
Liesbeth runs Fashion council Netherland and is modelling an outfit in Elsiens Gringhuis last lookbook
IIIF leather bag made by an independent female craftswoman
IIIF leather bag made by an independent female craftswoman

Idamari

Does all the work herself, in her studio in Berlin, and she is obviously a woman.

IIIF

Works with one craftswomen on Iceland for their leather bag-collection.

Kerber

Works with craftswomen (and men) in Hoi an in Vietnam. They get living wage and are encouraged in developing their skills, also taking part in the design process.

Retusj

Karen Pederstad is the designer behind Retusj, also made by hand by the designers herself in her studio in Oslo.

Just Fashion

Almost everybody involved in Just Fashion are women , and our founder is a woman. By supporting us, you also support our fight to find more designers who believe in gender and race-equality, regardless of their gender.

Just Fashion founder Marte DJupesland
Just Fashion founder Marte DJupesland

Learn more about gender equality

This video from World Economic Forum tells a short version of why the report about gender equality is important

Read and look at key statistics from the Gender Gap Report here, or download the total report.

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Behind our products

The designers at Just Fashion can tell you a lot of stories, still their products also speek for themselves.  Together we work towards full control and transparency in every aspect of the journey our products take. Here are some of them, take a look.

 

designer Anne Gorke
Designer Anne Gorke
Designer Cathrine Rosseland
The designer Cathrine Rosseland

 

 

 

 

Designer Marielle on her bicycle in Han Noi
Designer Marielle on her bicycle in Han Noi

 

Designers Linn and Nadja
Designer Linn and Nadja

 

Designer Elsien Gringhuis
Designer Elsien Gringhuis

 

Doris, the founder of Dutch Basics
Doris, the founder of Dutch Basics

 

Designer behind Apollonius Clothing Emma Linjedahl with her dog Kodac
Designer behind Apollonius Clothing Emma Linjedahl with her dog Kodac
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Where do dead clothes go?

Kerber - Silk top and skirt fw15

It all starts in the store

If you think of it, during a day, we have a huge amount of choices when we are shopping. And everything is about this:

  • How we buy what we need
  • How we use and maintain what we have bought
  • How we get rid of what we have, when we can no longer use it

In 2013, there where produced as much as 85,4 million tons of textile fibers worldwide, and the number increases dramatically each year. So every move we do as consumers helps. From which fabric you choose to begin with when you buy something new, to how you wash it, and how you get rid of it in the end. A great way to start is to think about it at the store.

 

If you choose a non-biodegradable textile like polyester, spandex, nylon etc, and it does not have a good recycling system, it will end up on landfills and can take from 20 to 200 years to fully biodegrade. We know that sometimes we love those products we find in the wrong materials, and sometimes it is better to choose a pant in polyester than in cotton because it may last much longer with wear and tear, but off course the best thing would be both at once.

 

landfills are growing.
landfills are growing.

 

Composting biodegradble textiles

We are making a series of blog-posts about where you can put things that die, telling you how to reuse/recycle /up-cycle them, and how to get rid of them in the end. Today we will talk about organic matter and how long it takes for them to biodegrade. It is the easiest textile to biodegrade, but it still needs to be put in the right environment though!

Choose ecological, and you can be sure that the whole process is without chemicals, also what ends up in your garden or on your plants. Coloured materials are OK to compost, but sometimes they can contain small amounts of chemicals if they are not coloured in an organic way.

 

Cotton

Cotton is one of the easiest textiles to biodegrade, especially if it is 100 % cotton. In a compost bin, it can biodegrade as fast as in a week, but also as long as 5 months.

Wool

Wool normally biodegrade in the course of a year, but can also take up to 5 years to biodegrade, depending on the treatment and type of wool.

black rat black unisex kim pants - 100 % wool jersey pants with a comfortable fit
black rat black unisex kim pants – 100 % wool jersey pants with a comfortable fit

Bamboo

Less than a year, sometimes a little more.

black rat bamboo female t-shirt, shown on model
black rat bamboo female t-shirt, shown on model

 

Linen

Also easy to brake down into soil. It can take as short as two weeks to 6 months.

Apollonius - from AW14 collection lookbook - linen shirt
Apollonius – from AW14 collection lookbook – linen shirt

 

Hemp

Is  usually not processed the way some of the materials mentioned above are. In most cases it uses really short amount of time to biodegrade, around a week to a month.

nosleepuntiljune aspectabund shirt in grey-blue
nosleepuntiljune aspectabund shirt in grey-blue, hemp and organic cotton

 

Silk

Up to a year, but sometimes longer.

Kerber - image header fw15
Kerber – fw15, 100 % silktop and silk skirt

 Composting process – how to do it!

 

Making a compost bin

If you have room for it, you could make your own compost bin, and your clothes can in time become natural fertilizer for you garden. A simpe search on Pinterest got us all these different ways to build your own compost bin. Big or small garden, you will find a DIY guide here.

 

compost bin where your biodegradable matter becomes food for your garden
compost bin where your biodegradable matter becomes food for your garden

Making an indoor compost bin

Many of us don’t have a garden, but the good news are that it is possible to make it work indoors as well!

We added an infographic from Ecowatch, but also check out this great guide from Forbes on how to make your own indoor compost bin in a small appartment.

 

how to make a small compost bin in your apprtment, source www.ecowatch.com
how to make a small compost bin in your apprtment, source www.ecowatch.com

 

Preparing the textiles for composting

  • Shred your clothes first. It is important to cut your clothes into smaller pieces, especially heavier fabrics like wool, to allow them to compost better.
  • Remove non-biodegradable materials like plastic or metal buttons and zippers before composting.
  • Make sure you add them to the bin alongside fresher, wetter items, don’t overwhelm your compost heap with old clothes – no more than 25% at a time.

You are ready for composting!

Follow our Composting-board on Pinterest to get our finds as we investigate further.

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Hello world!

Brand new site!

 

It was time for an upgrade, and finally it is here! Just Fashion have a brand new package to shine in.

We are so greatfull to our collaborators, Studio Netting for their great work! We recommend them to the world!

Our core is the same, as are our goals, giving you high quality products from designers with great core values. We will continue to tell you about our relationship with them, how we work together, and how we try to build our network of great suppliers and production sites.

 

We need change

 

“Second to oil, fashion and textiles is the most polluting industry in the world. Every stage in a garment’s life threatens our planet and its resources. It can take more than 20,000 litres of water to produce 1kg of cotton, equivalent to a single t-shirt and pair of jeans. Up to 8,000 different chemicals are used to turn raw materials into clothes, including a range of dyeing and finishing processes. And what becomes of the clothing that doesn’t sell, falls apart or goes out of style? More often than not, it is discarded in giant landfills. How can the fashion industry become more sustainable?”

BoF, Business of Voices

Just Fashion continues

Like Business of Fashion, and their great site for debate and discussions around new solutions, Business of Fashion Voices, we will try to keep up and make steps in a better direction every day. The world is changing fast, and each time we do our choices we make a difference. We got so much more power than we think.

 

Just Fashion presents a careful selection of sustainable design - her shown with dotted stockings by Swedish Stockings
Just Fashion presents a careful selection of sustainable design

 

We hope you will continue to enjoy our concept and vision. Ask us questions. Give us feedback. And take part in moving things.

Lots of Love from Marte and the Just Fashion Team

 

Just Fashion founder Marte Djupesland
Just Fashion founder Marte Djupesland